Kromofons – Text as color

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Kromofons is an alphabet, created by Florida physician Lee Freedman. The idea is that each letter of the alphabet corresponds to a color, allowing messages to be embedded in color images.

For 35 years, between stints as a doctor, a real estate agent and a pizza maker at the Woodstock concert in 1994, Freedman has been working on Kromofons–an innovative alphabet in which the 26 English letters are represented solely by individual colors–waiting for technology to catch up with him.

And now, thanks to the Internet, the ubiquity of color monitors, Microsoft Word plug-ins and his being able to launch a Kromofons-based e-mail system, Freedman thinks he is finally ready.

Imagine getting an e-mail whose text is not the familiar black letters on a white background, but instead a series of colored rectangles.

That’s how Kmail, the Kromofons e-mail system, works. Using a translation key, Kmail recipients can piece together what a message says, letter by letter, word by word.

Continue reading the article over at C|NET.

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