All posts filed under: History

Hamilton Stories: Norbert Brylski Interview

“HWT Brylski” is a typeface by Nick Sherman, named for retired wood type cutter Norb Brylski, and designed to be cut as wood type at the Hamilton Wood Type & Printing Museum in Two Rivers, Wisconsin. It incorporates several themes that were common in 19th-century type design, including split Tuscan serifs with angled mansard-style sides, […]

300m lenght type project by Gordon Young and Andy Altman

Created by artist Gordon Young and designer Andy Altman of Why Not Associates, that brought us the Comedy Carpet, this piece is again based on the ground, created from granite that over the next few years will reach a whopping 300m in length. Instead of gags, the piece will display a list of cargo goods that […]

Typographische Monatsblätter Research Archive

What an amazing site. An exhaustive research on the Typographische Monatsblätter (TM) focussing on the issues from 1960 till 1990. The Typographische Monatsblätter was one of the most important journals to successfully disseminate the phenomenon of ‘Swiss typography’ to an international audience. With more than 70 years in existence, the journal witnessed significant moments in […]

Type Talk interview with Paul Rand and Mario Rampone

On Paul Rand site: There are essentially two kinds of typography: The familiar kind for reading, and the other, simply for viewing, like a painting. Some say that readability is most important. There are really two important things about typography: readability and beauty; both are equally important. However, many readable typefaces are visually offensive. The […]

Michael Bierut interview

[kml_flashembed movie=”http://www.theatlantic.com/images/issues/200801u/bcPlayer_singleTitle.swf?titleID=1366496264″ width=”450″ height=”412″ wmode=”transparent” /] Here is an interview with graphic designer Michael Bierut, where he talks about the evolution of type, the various covers of The Catcher in the Rye, the ugliness of ITC Garamond, and all sorts of other intriguing things. Source: The Atlantic